ethics

Course Description

Course: Ethics for Texas LCDCs (3 hours)

Course Description:The purpose of this course is to help Texas LCDCs review Sections 150.1 (Definitions), 150.12 (Scope of Practice), 150.42 (Ethical Standards), and 150.43 (Actions Against a License) of the LCDC Handbood. After reading these sections, participants will take a 30 item quiz made up of case vignettes illuminating ethical guidelines presented in the LCDC Handbook. This course attempts to meet the guidelines of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment's (CSAT) Technical Assistance Publication (TAP) # 21 (Section 2, VIII, 1) by providing information regarding the Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes (KSA's) needed by addiction counselors to meet professional ethical standards. Objectives:The course objectives coincide with the KSA's: Upon completion of course, participants will: 1) Recall the definition of abuse, neglect and exploitation, as well as the procedure for reporting such issues; 2) Explain professional standards and scope of practice; 3) Identify rules regarding sexual contact and other boundary issues; 4) Evaluate guidelines and limits regarding confidentiality; 5) Identify the difference between the role of professional counselor and that of a peer counselor or sponsor; 6) Recall means for addressing, and consequences of, alleged ethical violations.


Course Outline: I. Course Pre-Quiz II. (text) Definitions III. Scope of Practice IV. Ethical Standards V. Actions Against a License VI. Course Quiz VII. Course Evaluation

Course: HIV, Hepatitis C., and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (6 hours)

Course Description: This course attempts to meet the guidelines of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment’s (CSAT) Technical Assistance Publication (TAP) #21 (Section 2, VI, 8), by providing information regarding the Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes (KSA’s) needed by counselors to address the health and behavioral problems related to substance abuse and the transmission and prevention of HIV, Hepatitis C., and STDs. This course text involves information from several government sources including the National Institute On Drug Abuse, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration-TIP.

Course Outline: I. What Is HIV/AIDS and How Is It Spread? II. How Are HIV/AIDS and Drug Abuse Linked? III. Drug-Associated HIV Transmission Continues in the United States. IV. Integrating HIV/AIDS and Alcohol Research. V. Impact of Alcohol Use on HIV/AIDS Prevention. VI. Treatment of Concurrent HIV/AIDS and Alcohol Problems. VII. Hepatitis C and Substance Use. VIII. Counseling Approaches for People Who Have Viral Hepatitis. IX. STDs. X. Issues for Counselors.

Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: 1) Identify how HIV and drug abuse are linked; 2) Assess the impact alcohol use has on HIV; 3) Explain the screening and treatment for Hepatitis C; 4) Discuss the prevalence of STDs among populations, 5) Understand the components to be covered in Pre and Post test counseling for those with positive results; 6) Identify and explain the principles and strategies for counseling clients with HIV, Hepatitis C., and STDs.

Course: Professional Interventions That Facilitate 12-Step Help Group Involvement (3 hours)

Course Description: The course text is from an article found in Alcohol Research & Health and is written by Keith Humphreys, Ph.D. This article discusses the rationale for interventions that facilitate alcohol-dependent patients' affiliations with AA and related mutual-help oragnizations such as Narcotics Anonymous. The article also reviews recent research comparing those interventions with other methods. This course attempts to meet the Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes (KSA's) of the CSAT's Technical Assistance Publication # 21 (Section 1, I., B, 1) by providing information describing the outcomes of self-help group invovlement and justification for validity of self-help approaches. Also, to adhere to the KSA's of TAP # 21, (Section 2, III) by providing information that endorses counselor referral self-help community resources.


Course Outline: I. Introduction; A. Facilitating involvement in 12-steps; B. Effectiveness of TSF; II. Importance of 12-step Group Affiliation in Alcohol Treatment; A. Overview of research regarding effectiveness of AA; B. Influence of Managed Care in enhancing interest in cost-effective care III. Evaluation of TSF; A. Project MATCH and VA study; 1. Comparison of TSF with CB therapy and MET; 2. Comparison of 12-step with CB therapy; IV. Conclusions from recent research; V. Directions for future research.


Objectives:Upon completion of this course, participants will: 1) Recall reasons for the importance of 12-step group affiliation in alcohol treatment; 2) Examine recent evaluations of TSF interventions; 3) Reveiw the major goals of 12-step facilitation in Project MATCH; and 4) Recall comparison of Twelve-step Facilitation interventions with Cognitive behaviorial therapy and Motivational Enhancement Therapy in Project MATCH.

Course: Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons With Co-Occurring Disorders (9 hours)

Course Description: Participants will read the text and then complete a 30 item true-false quiz. The text for this course is from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration/Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (SAMHSA/CSAT) Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Number 42, titled: Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons With Co-Occurring Disorders. The TIP attempts to summarize for the clinician the state-of-the-art in the treatment of co-occurring disorder (COD) in the substance abuse and mental health fields. It contains chapters on terminology, assessment, and treatment strategies and models, as well as recommendations for treatment, research, and policy planning. The primary concern of this TIP is co-occurring substance use (abuse and dependence) and mental disorders, even though it is recognized that this same vulnerable population also is subject to many other physical and social ills. The TIP includes important work on nicotine dependence, a somewhat large and separate body of work that admittedly does need further integration into the general field of COD. Nicotine dependency is treated here as an important cross-cutting issue. Finally, although the TIP does address several specific populations (i.e., homeless, criminal justice, and women), it does this briefly and does not describe programs specifically for adolescents or for such specialized populations as new Asian and Hispanic/Latino immigrants. At the same time, the authors fully recognize, and the TIP states, that all COD treatment must be culturally relevant. : The text for this course is from SAMHSA/CSAT Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Number 42, titled: Substance Abuse Treatment for Persons With Co-Occurring Disorders. Found online at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=hstat5.chapter.74073 KSA Dimension and Sub Element: Section 1 (Transdisciplinary Foundations), A (Understanding Addiction), 4, Knowledge (a)(b)(c)(d), Attitudes (a)(b)(c)(d).


Objectives:Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: 1) Identify the definitions, terms, and classification systems for co-occurring disorders; 2) Recall keys to successful co-occurring disorder programming; 3) Review the basic screening, assessment, and treatment strategies for clients with co-occurring disorders; 4) Understand the traditional and special settings, models, and specific populations of co-occurring disorders; 5) Describe elements of working with substance abuse treatment clients who also have the cross-cutting issues of suicidality and nicotine dependence; 6) Identify the ways that toxic effects of substances can mimic mental illness.

Course: Substance Abuse Treatment and Family Therapy (12 hours)

Course Description: Participants will read the text and then take an online quiz. This text, TIP #39, Substance Abuse Treatment and Family Therapy, addresses how substance abuse affects the entire family and how substance abuse treatment providers can use principles from family therapy to change the interactions among family members. The TIP provides basic information about family therapy for substance abuse treatment professionals and basic information about substance abuse treatment for family therapists. The TIP presents the models, techniques and principles of family therapy, with special attention to the stages of motivation as well as to treatment and recovery. Discussion also focuses on clinical decision making and training, supervision, cultural considerations, specific populations, funding and research. The TIP further identifies future directions for both research and clinical practice.


References: The text for this course is from SAMHSA/CSAT Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Number 39, titled: Substance Abuse Treatment and Family Therapy. Found online at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=hstat5.chapter.70382 KSA Dimension and Sub Element: Section 1 (Transdisciplinary Foundations), B (Treatment Knowledge), 2, Knowledge (a),(b), Attitudes(a).


Objectives:Upon course completion, participants will: 1) Review the evolution of family therapy as a component of substance abuse treatment; 2) Recall primary models of family therapy from a systems perspective; 3) Identify the stages of change and levels of recovery from substance abuse; 4) Understand treatment issues likely to arise in different family structures that include a person abusing substances such as the economic and psychological consequences that spouses, parents, and children experience; 5) Describe how substance abuse treatment and family therapy can be integrated to provide effective solutions to multiple problems; 6) Review the application of treatment with special populations; 7) Understand some of the policy implications for effectively joining family therapy and substance abuse treatment.

Course: Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy (9 hours)

Course Description: This is an online course. Participants will read the text and then complete a quiz. The text is from SAMHSA/CSAT Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Number 41, titled: Substance Abuse Treatment: Group Therapy. This text presents an overview of the role and efficacy of group therapy in substance abuse treatment planning. The goal of this TIP is to offer the latest research and clinical findings and to distill them into practical guidelines for practitioners of group therapy modalities in the field of substance abuse treatment. The TIP describes effective types of group therapy and offers a theoretical basis for group therapy's effectiveness in the treatment of substance use disorders. This work also will be a useful guide to supervisors and trainers of beginning counselors, as well as to experienced counselors. Finally, the TIP is meant to provide researchers and clinicians with a guide to sources of information and topics for further inquiry. Objectives: Upon successful completion of this course, participants will: 1) Identify the benefits of group therapy and the differences between group therapy and 12 Step Self Help Groups; 2) Understand the types of group therapy commonly used in substance abuse treatment; 3) Recall criteria for placement of clients in groups; 4) Describe fixed and revolving group membership and the phases of group therapy; 5) Review the characteristics of the early, middle, and late stages of treatment; 6) Describe desirable leader traits and behaviors, along with the concepts and techniques vital to process groups; 7) Understand the skills group therapy clinicians need, the purpose and value of clinical supervision, and how to get the training necessary to be a group clinician or supervisor of clinicians.

Course: Alcohol Abuse and Violence Against Women (4 hours)

Course Description: Each year, more than 500,000 non-fatal violent crimes are committed against women. These crimes include sexual assault, rape, intimate partner violence, and elder abuse. Many of these crimes involve the use of alcohol or other drugs. Addiction professionals are on the front lines in being able to help people affected by alcohol abuse and violence against women. Domestic violence and alcohol abuse are so widespread that nearly one-third of all Americans know a woman who has suffered violence from her partners, and an even higher number know someone affected by alcohol abuse. The course describes these "hidden problems" and identifies risk factors, screening and assessment tools, prevention and intervention strategies, tools for clients, and legal issues.


Objectives:Upon course completion, participants will: 1) Review addiction and alcoholism, the behaviors associated with it, as well as diagnostic criteria; 2) Clarify the definitions of the various types of violence against women (e.g., rape, domestic violence) and the types and methods of abuse, myths, medical and psychological effects of violence, and problems during pregnancy; 3) Understand the links between alcohol and domestic violence, theories regarding the intersection of alcohol and violence, and their effects on children and teenagers; 4) Recall terms relating to sexual assault and rape and prevention strategies; 5) Examine prevention and education techniques; 6) Review various screenings for domestic violence, sexual assault, battering, and alcohol abuse; 7) Understand the diagnosis and treatment for substance abuse, sexual assault, and domestic violence within the treatment fields of substance abuse and violence against women; 8) Review legal and ethical issues related to alcohol addiction, domestic violence and sexual assault.

Course: Uncovering Substance Use and Elder Abuse (6 hours)

Course Description: Every year, millions of older people are at risk of physical, psychological, or other forms of elder abuse and neglect. Yet, elder abuse remains a largely hidden problem. Contrary to popular belief, most elder abuse occurs within family settings. Elder abuse is preventable. Effective responses are needed to address the causes of the abuse, regardless of the setting and circumstance. As with other forms of violence, one of the most common factors that put older people at risk is the victim's or perpetrator's abuse of alcohol or other substances. This course examines substance abuse and other risk factors for elder abuse and identifies intervention techniques and effective prevention activities at the individual, family, and community level. This online course provides an introduction to elder abuse in the family and institutional settings. Although laws and responsibilities may vary among these settings, practitioners stress the importance of defining and addressing elder abuse across the spectrum -- whether at home or in a long-term care setting. (Research shows that although elder self-neglect shares common risk factors with other forms of elder abuse, additional complexities indicate an in-depth discussion of self-neglect requires separate study.) This online course uses definitions developed by the National Elder Abuse Incidence Study, the nation's first major report examining the extent of elder abuse. These definitions are applied to abuse within the family and institutional settings.


Objectives:Upon completing this course, participants will: Part I: 1) Understand the nature, scope, and severity of elder abuse; 2) Identify substance abuse as a major risk factor contributing to elder abuse. 3) Recognize the societal and cultural context of elder abuse; Part II: 4) Identify three types of abuse suffered by older adults; 5) Recognize the role of family in elder abuse trends; 6) List three consequences of abuse and neglect for the older adult, the abuser, and society; Part III: 7) Recognize substance abuse as a major risk factor associated with elder abuse and neglect; 8) Identify three substance abuse patterns that practitioners have observed in victims of elder abuse and their perpetrators; 9) List three barriers to intervention in substance abuse-related elder abuse. Part IV: 10) Identify three indicators that could signal elder abuse; 11) Identify two warning signs of problem alcohol use that mimic signs of aging; 12) List three barriers to identifying elder abuse. Part V: 13) Recognize the role that Adult Protective Services and the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program play in intervention and treatment of elder abuse; 14) Identify a range of methods for intervention; 15) Identify health and mental health and other services to help victims of abuse. Part VI: 16) Identify two protective factors to help older people build resiliency and avoid abuse; 17) Identify two approaches to help prevent abuse among families and caregivers; 18) Define the multidisciplinary team approach toward elder abuse prevention and its benefits.

Course: The Link Between Substance Abuse and Suicide (6 hours)

Disclaimer : This text is taken from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Mental Health Information Center, Center for Mental Health Services.

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to help advance the goals and objectives of the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention (NSSP). The modules are designed to promote awareness of the link between substance abuse and suicide as well as other risk factors. The course includes information about tools and other resources to identify suicidal behaviors and to provide early intervention and prevention. The modules are designed to alert healthcare professionals to the latest research and strategies for effective responses.


Objectives:Upon course completion, participants will: 1) Understand the nature, scope, and severity of the problem and the connection between substance abuse and suicide; 2) Identify substance abuse as a major risk factor for those who attempt or complete suicide; 3) Recognize five suicide warning signs; 4) Differentiate between suicidal ideation, suicide planning, suicide attempt, and suicide; 5) List five examples of the biopsychosocial, environmental, and/or sociocultural dimensions of suicide; 6) Describe three protective factors; 7) Identify alcohol as the abused substance most often associated with the spectrum of suicidal behaviors and outcomes; 8) Recognize the importance of co-occurring disorders (co-existing substance abuse and mental health disorders); 9) Identify three common characteristics among people diagnosed with co-occurring disorders that increase the risk of suicide; 10) Identify the suicide risks and behaviors particular to youth, adults, and older adulthood; 11) Understand the multi-generational transmission of some suicide risk factors across the generations; 12) List common barriers or stigmas preventing individuals from seeking help for suicidal behaviors and/or substance abuse; 13) Recognize five of the special populations that have unique risks for suicide: 14) Understand that many cultural differences affect the risks for both suicide and substance abuse; 15) Identify some of the ways that members of special populations have needs that are unmet; 16) Recognize the continuum of care for prevention to early intervention and treatment; 17) Identify the key prevention and early intervention partners in the community; 18) Determine relevant prevention programs, along with private and public initiatives to prevent suicide.

Course: Detoxification and Substance Abuse Treatment (12 hours)

Course Description: This is from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Treatment Improvement Protocol 45. Among the issues covered in this TIP is the importance of detoxification as one component in the continuum of healthcare services for substance-related disorders. The TIP reinforces the urgent need for nontraditional settings-emergency rooms, medical and surgical wards in hospitals, acute care clinics, and others-to be prepared to participate in the process of getting the patient who is in need of detoxification services into treatment as quickly as possible. Furthermore, it promotes the latest strategies for retaining individuals in detoxification while also encouraging the development of the therapeutic alliance to promote the patient's entrance into substance abuse treatment. The TIP also includes suggestions on addressing psychosocial issues that may impact detoxification treatment, such as providing culturally appropriate services to the patient population.


Objectives:Upon course completion, participants will: 1) Review essential concepts and definitions in detoxification; 2) Understand the settings, levels of care, and patient placement of individuals undergoing detoxification; 3) Review the psychosocial and biomedical issues during detoxification; 4) Recall the services available for withdrawal from specific substances; 5) Examine the co-occurring medical and psychiatric conditions involved with detoxification; 6) Review financing and organizational issues related to detoxification services.

Course: Clinical Issues in Intensive Outpatient Treatment (12 hours)

Course Description: This text is from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration TIP #47. This Treatment Improvement Protocol, Substance Abuse: Clinical Issues in Intensive Outpatient Treatment, addresses the practical needs of treatment providers as they design and implement IOT programs. The TIP provides specific information on the principles of intensive outpatient treatment; services and treatment models; modifications for distinct population groups; culturally competent treatment; screening and patient placement criteria; counseling methods and techniques, including involvement of families; and the continuum of care. The TIP also covers such important issues as how to improve early retention, provide the appropriate length and intensity of services, provide the most promising mix of wrap-around services for positive client outcomes, and arrange ongoing care in the community.


Objectives:Participants in this course will: 1) Understand principles of Intensive Outpatient Treatment: 2) Review IOP and the Continuum of Care; 3) Recall elements of services in IOP programs; 4) Evaluate components of treatment entry and engagement; 5) Understand family based services in IOP programs; 6) Review clinical issues, challenges, and strategies in Intensive Outpatient Treatment; 7) Examine various IOP treatment approaches.

Course: Clinical Supervision and Professional Development of the Substance Abuse Counselor
Course Description: Part 1 of the TIP is for clinical supervisors and consists of two chapters. Chapter 1 presents basic information about clinical supervision in the substance abuse treatment field.  Chapter 2 presents the “how to” of clinical supervision. Part 2 is an implementation guide for program administrators and consists of two chapters. Chapter 1 lays out the rationale for the approach taken in chapter 2 and will help administrators understand the benefits and rationale behind providing clinical supervision for their program’s substance abuse counselors. Chapter 2 provides tools for making the tasks associated with implementing a clinical supervision system easier.

Outline: I. Part 1: Central Principles of Clinical Supervision II. Guidelines for new Supervisors III. Models of Clinical Supervision IV. Developmental Stages of Counselors V. Developmental Stages of Supervisors VI. Cultural and Contextual Factors  VII. Ethical and Legal Issues VIII. Monitoring Performance  IX. Methods of Observation  X. Practical Issues in Clinical XI. Methods and Techniques of Clinical Supervision XII. Administrative Supervision XIII. Resources XIV. Vignettes  Part 2: I.Benefits and Rationale II. Key Issues for Administrators in Clinical Supervision  III. Administrative and Clinical Supervision  IV. Legal and Ethical Issues for Administrators  V. Diversity and Cultural Competence VI. Developing a Model for Clinical Supervision VII. Implementing a Clinical Supervision Program VIII. Professional Development of Supervisors IX. Assessing Organizational Readiness X. Legal and Ethical Issues of Supervision XI. Supervision Guidelines XII. The Supervision Contract XIII. The Initial Supervision Sessions XIV. Evaluation of Counselors and Supervisors XV. Individual Development Plan XVI. Outline for Case Presentations Audio- and Videotaping.

Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: Identify the Central Principles of Clinical Supervision; 2) Understand the models of clinical supervision; 3) Recall the developmental stages of supervisors; 4) Assess monitoring performance issues; 5) Evaluate methods and techniques of clinical supervision; 6) Assess organizational readiness; 7)  Understand the application of  supervision techniques in case presentations.

 

Course: COMPETENCIES FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT CLINICAL SUPERVISORS

Course Description: This course is from SAMHSA TIP 21-A. This course lists the competencies necessary for effective supervision in alcohol abuse and drug abuse treatment programs. The text provides administrators with step-by-step guidelines for implementing a comprehensive supervisory training and workforce development component. TAP 21-A is designed to accompany TAP 21, taking monitoring,assessment, and improvement of addiction counseling competencies to the next level.

Outline: I. A Competency-Based Framework for Clinical Supervision II. Directions for Future III.
Why Have Implementation Guidelines? IV. What Needs To Be Implemented? V. Theories, Roles, and Modalities of Clinical Supervision VI. Leadership VII. Supervisory Alliance VIII. Critical Thinking IX. Organizational Management and Administration X. Performance Domains
XI. Counselor Development XII. Professional and Ethical Standards XIII. Program Development and Quality Assurance XIV. Performance Evaluation XV. Administration.

Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: 1) Understand the reasons for having implementation guidelines 2) Recall the five areas of focus for implementation 3) Identify modalities of supervision 4) Evaluate qualities of leadership 5) Describe supervisory alliance 6) Understand critical thinking 7) Identify the five performance domains.

 

Course: Substance Abuse Treatment: Addressing the Specific Needs of Women

Course Description: This is part of the Treatment Improvement Protocol s (TIPs) series developed by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, part of SAMHSA.   By placing emphasis on the importance of context, many topics examine the role of factors that influence women’s substance use from initiation of use to engagement of continuing care treatment services, i.e., relationships, gender socialization, and culture. The knowledge and models presented here are grounded in women’s experiences, built on women’s strengths, and based on best, promising, or research-based practices. The primary goal of this TIP is to assist substance abuse treatment providers in offering effective, up-to-date treatment to adult women with substance use disorders.

Outline: I. Creating the Context 1  II. Patterns of Use: From Initiation to Treatment  
III. Physiological Effects of Alcohol, Drugs, and Tobacco on Women  IV. Screening and Assessment  
V. Treatment Engagement, Placement, and Planning  VI. Substance Abuse Among Specific Population Groups and Settings  VII. Substance Abuse Treatment for Women  VIII. Recovery Management and Administrative Considerations.

Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: Identify the patterns of Use among women; 2) Understand the screening and assessment of women; 3) Describe the treatment engagement, placement, and planning of substance abuse treatment for women; 4) Identify substance abuse issues among specific populations groups among women; 5) Recall recovery management and administrative considerations.

 

Course: Prevention Interventions of Alcohol Problems in the Workplace

Course Description: The workplace offers advantages as a setting for interventions that result in primary prevention of alcohol abuse. Such programs have the potential to reach broad audiences and populations that would otherwise not receive prevention programs and, thereby, benefit both the employee and employer. This text is from an article from the Institute on Alcohol Abuse And Alcoholism publication Alcohol Research & Health, Volume 34, Issue 2. This article presents findings from several recent workplace prevention–intervention studies and focuses on those intervention efforts that target all employees, regardless of level of alcohol consumption and problems.  

Outline: I.Workplace Interventions II.WebBased Interventions III.Interventions Focused on the Work Environment IV.Prevention in the Military: Early Results of an Environmental Strategy V.Summary and Recommendations for a Guiding Framework.

Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will: 1) Identify workplace interventions 2) Review five studies evaluating the effectiveness of WebBased Interventions 3) Assess Interventions Focused on the Work Environment 4) Understand results of an environmental prevention strategy in the military 5) Review the recommendations for a guiding framework presented by the authors.

 

Course Description: The Risks Associated With Alcohol Use and Alcoholism:

Course Description: Alcohol consumption, particularly heavier drinking, is an important risk factor for many health problems and, thus, is a major contributor to the global burden of disease. In fact, alcohol is a necessary underlying cause for more than 30 conditions and a contributing factor to many more. This is an article from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism’s publication Alcohol Research & Health, Vol. 34, No. 2, 2011. This article first defines which conditions necessarily are caused by alcohol use and for which conditions alcohol use is a contributing factor. It then looks more closely at the most common disease risks associated with excessive alcohol use, before exploring how these risks have influenced guidelines for drinking limits.

Outline: I. Disease and Injury Conditions Associated With Alcohol Use. II. Conditions for Which Alcohol Is a Component Cause. III. Individual Disease and Injury Conditions Associated With Alcohol Use. IV. Implications of Alcohol Related Risks for Drinking Guidelines. V. Overall Global Impact of Alcohol Consumption on Burden of Disease. VI. Effects of Alcohol on People Other Than the Drinker.

Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will: 1) Identify the Disease and Injury Conditions Associated With Alcohol Use; 2) Assess Conditions for Which Alcohol Is a Component Cause; 3) Identify the Implications of Alcohol Related Risks for Drinking Guidelines; 4) Recall the overall Global Impact of Alcohol Consumption on Burden of Disease; 5) Examine the effects of alcohol on people other than the drinker.

 

Course Description: Addressing Suicidal Thoughts And Behaviors in Substance Abuse Treatment

Course Description: This is a Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs), developed by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), part of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). These are best-practices guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders. This TIP is organized into two parts: Part 1 for substance abuse counselors focuses on providing appropriate counseling methods and frameworks. Part 2 for program administrators focuses on providing administrative support to implement adoption of the counseling recommendations made in Part 1.  

Outline: I. Addressing Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Substance Abuse Treatment: Information You Need To Know a. Getting Ready To Address Suicidality  b.GATE: Procedures for Substance Abuse Counselors c.Competencies II. Addressing Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Substance Abuse Treatment: Clinical Vignettes Demonstrating How To Apply the Information III. Addressing Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors: An Implementation Guide for Administrators a. Introduction b.Consensus Panel Recommendations for Administrators c. The Benefits of Addressing Suicidality in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs d. Why Should Administrators Be Involved in a Clinical Issue? e. Levels of Program Involvement and Core Program Components f. The Role of Administrators in Implementing and Supporting Programming for Clients With Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors g. The Role of Mid-Level Staff in Implementing and Supporting Programming for Clients With Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors h. Legal and Ethical Issues in Addressing Suicidality in Substance Abuse Programs. IV.Addressing Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Substance Abuse Treatment: Building a Suicide Prevention- and Intervention-Capable Agency a. Introduction. b.Organizational Assessment. c.Organizational Planning for Becoming a Level 2 Program d.Program Implementation. e.Helping Your Program Develop and Improve Capabilities in Working With Clients Who Are Suicidal f.Helping Your Agency Develop and Improve Its Response to Suicidal Crises. g.Building Administrative Support for All Levels of GATE

Objectives: Upon course completion, participants will be able to: 1) Recall the meaning of the acronym GATE; 2) Identify the eight competencies for working with clients who are suicidal in substance abuse treatment settings; 3) Assess viable treatment options for clients presented in Vignettes; 4) Evaluate recommendations for administrators; 5) Explain  the Benefits of Addressing Suicidality in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs; 6) Examine levels of Program Involvement and Core Program Components; 7) Identify ways to help Programs Develop and Improve Capabilities in Working With Clients Who Are Suicidal.

 

Course: Managing Depressive Symptoms in Substance Abuse Clients During Early Recovery

Course Description: This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) is designed to assist the substance abuse counselor in working with clients who are experiencing depressive symptoms. These symptoms occur along a continuum of intensity from mild to severe. It is clear from clinical research and practice that a significant percentage of your clients have depressive symptoms. Some, but not all, will have these depressive symptoms in the context of a mood disorder diagnosis.

Outline: I.Managing Depressive Symptoms in Substance Abuse Clients During Early Recovery a.Framework. b.Preparing Yourself To Work With Clients With Depressive Symptoms. c.Screening and Assessment. d.Treatment Planning. e.Treatment. f.Continuing Care and Treatment Termination II. Managing Depressive Symptoms in Substance Abuse Clients During Early Recovery. a.Vignette Behavioral Interventions. b.Vignette 2—Cognitive Interventions. c.Vignette 3—Interventions With Core Beliefs. d.Vignette 4—Interventions With Feelings. III.Managing Depressive Symptoms: An Implementation Guide for Administrators. a.Consensus Panel Recommendations for Administrators. b.Why Address Depressive Symptoms? c.Thinking About Organizational Change. d.The Role of the Administrator in Introducing and Supporting New Clinical Practices.IV.Managing Depressive Symptoms: An Implementation Guide for Administrators. a.Assessment and Planning Before Implementation. b.Addressing Policies and Procedures. c.Addressing Relevant Regulations. d.Addressing Staff Competence. e.Addressing Community Relationships. f.Addressing Financial Considerations. g.Addressing Continuity and Fidelity

Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: 1) Identify the depressive symptoms; 2) Identify elements of Treatment and Treatment Planning; 3) Recall screening and assessment definitions; 4) Explain cognitive, behavioral, and emotional interventions; 5) Examine the role of the administrator; 6) Review policies and procedures regarding clients with depressive symptoms; 7) Identify elements of organizational commitment to delivering services to manage depressive symptoms.

 

Course: Regulating Availability: How Access to Alcohol Affects Drinking and Problems in Youth and Adults

Course Description: This text is from the National Institute On Alcohol Abuse And Alcoholism, Alcohol Research & Health, Volume 34, Issue Number 2. Regulations on the availability of alcohol have been used to moderate alcohol problems in communities throughout the world for thousands of years. In the latter half of the 20th century, quantitative studies of the effects of these regulations on drinking and related problems began in earnest as public health practitioners began to recognize the full extent of the harmful consequences related to drinking. This article briefly outlines the history of this work over four areas, focusing on the minimum legal drinking age, the privatization of alcohol control systems, outlet densities, and hours and days of sale.

Outline: I.Availability Regulation II.Minimum Legal Drinking Age III.Privatization and the Elimination of State Alcohol Controls: Deconstructing Alcohol Monopolies IV.Retail Availability: Outlet Density V.Public Policy and Social Ecological Theory VI.Retail Availability: Hours and Days of Sale VII.Regulating Youth Access: Local Regulatory Policy, College Drinkers, and Underage Youth VIII.Future Directions

Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: 1) Examine the impact of minimum legal drinking age (MLDA) laws on alcohol problems; 2) Discuss the relationship between the privatization of alcohol control systems and increased alcohol sales and problems; 3) Review the impact of outlet density on alcohol use and problems; 4) Assess the effects of regulation on retail outlet hours and days of sale of alcohol.

 

Course: Implementing Change in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs

Course Description: This is from SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, Technical Assistance Publication (TAP) 31: Implementing Change in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs. Itoffers guidance on how to integrate evidence-based practices (EBPs)for substance abuse treatment into clinical practice. Informed by the realities of many substance abuse treatment providers, it suggests efficient solutions for implementing change based on proven methods. Through a practical step-by-step narrative, it explain show to assess an organization’s capacity o identify priorities, implement changes, evaluate progress, and sustain effective programs over the long run.

Outline: I. Introduction. a.Challenges of Implementing Change. b.Core Concepts c.Models of implementing change II. Preplanning. a.What are the best practices. b.How does your program compare. c.How do TAU outcomes compare With EBP Outcomes. III. Planning. a.Who should be at the planning table. b.Where exactly do you want to go. c.What are the change targets.  IV.Implementation. a.Are you there yet. b.How do you navigate roadblocks.  V.Evaluation  a.Before you begin. b.Estimating cost. c.Planning the evaluation. d.Collecting data. e.Analyzing data. VI. Sustainability. a.Sustainability phases. b.Where’s the money?

Objectives: Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to: 1) Recall the challenges pressures of implementing change in the substance abuse field; 2) Identify the reasons and advantages for implementing evidence based practices; 3) Review the core concepts guiding change in substance abuse
Treatment; 4) Explain the five stages of organizational change; 5) Understand strategies for effective Implementation; 6) Discuss guidelines for successful evaluation.

 

Course: Principles of Drug Abuse Treatment for Criminal Justice Populations

Course Description: This text is from the National Institute of Drug Abuse. It describes the treatment principles and research findings that have particular relevance to the criminal justice community and to treatment professionals working with drug abusing offenders. It is divided into three main sections: 1) research findings on addicted offenders distilled into 13 essential principles, 2) a series of frequently asked questions (FAQs) about drug abuse treatment for those involved with the criminal justice system, and 3) a resource section that provides Web sites for additional information.

Outline: I. Principles II. Introduction. III. Why do people involved in the criminal justice system continue abusing drugs? IV. Why should drug abuse treatment be provided to offenders?  V. How effective is drug abuse treatment for criminal justice-involved individuals? VI. Are all drug abusers in the criminal justice system good candidates for treatment?  VII. Is legally mandated treatment effective?  VIII. Are relapse risk factors different in offender populations? How should drug abuse treatment deal with these risk factors? IX. What treatment and other health services should be provided to drug abusers involved with the criminal justice system? X. How long should drug abuse treatment last for individuals involved in the criminal justice system? XI. How can rewards and sanctions be used effectively with drug-involved offenders in treatment? XII. What is the role of medications in treating substance abusing offenders?
XIII.How can the criminal justice and drug abuse treatment systems reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, and other infectious diseases among drug abusing offenders? XIV. What works for offenders with co-occurring substance abuse and mental disorders?  XV. Is providing drug abuse treatment to offenders worth the financial investment? XVI. What are the unique treatment needs for women in the criminal justice system? XVII. What are the unique treatment needs of juveniles in the criminal justice system? XVIII. Resources

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course participants will be able to: 1) Identify reasons people in the criminal justice system continue using drugs; 2) Provide reasons drug abuse treatment should be provided to offenders; 3) Evaluate the effectiveness of court ordered treatment: 4) Review relapse risk factors for the criminal justice population; 5) Understand the duration of effective treatment, and the role of medications in treatment for the criminal justice population.

 

Course: Prescription Drugs: Abuse and Addiction

Course Description: The number of prescriptions for some prescription drugs has increased dramatically since the early 1990s. Prescription drug abuse is not a new problem, but one that deserves renewed attention. The text for this course is from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and examines the non-medical use of prescription drugs including opioids, central nervous system depressants, and stimulants. This course describes adverse health effects of their use and the prevention and treatment of addiction.

Outline: I. What is prescription drug abuse? II. What are some of the commonly abused prescription drugs? III. Opioids IV.CNS depressants V.Stimulants VI.Trends in prescription drug abuse.VII.Preventing and recognizing prescription drug abuse. VIII.Treating prescription drug addiction. IX. Chronic Pain Treatment and Addiction.

Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will: 1) Recall some of the commonly abused prescription drugs; 2) Review the affect of opioids, CNS depressants, and stimulants on the brain and body; 3) Identify the possible consequences of opioid, CNS depressant, and stimulant use and abuse; 4) Assess trends associated with prescription drug abuse including demographics and health consequences.  

 

Course: School Based Programs to Prevent and Reduce Alcohol Use Among Youth

Course Description: The text for this course is from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism publication Alcohol Research & Health, Volume 34, Issue Number 2, 2011.
The text describes school based approaches to alcohol prevention, highlighting evidence based examples of this method of intervention, and suggests directions for future research. This summary primarily is based on several recent reviews focusing on alcohol prevention among underage youth.

Outline: I.Characteristics of School Based Alcohol Prevention Programs. II. Examples of Evidence Based, School Based Alcohol Prevention Programs. III. Future Directions for School Based Alcohol Prevention Interventions. a.School Based Interventions for Elementary School and High School Settings. b.School Based Interventions for Special Populations. IV.Conclusion.

Objectives: Upon course completion, participants will: 1) Identify characteristics and examples of school based alcohol prevention programs; 2) Explain the future direction of school based alcohol prevention interventions for elementary and high school settings;3) Recall school based interventions for special populations.

 

Course: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Research Challenges and Opportunities

Course Description: This text is from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism’s Alcohol Research and Health publication. This text tracks the changing concepts and refinements in diagnoses that have occurred since the first description of FAS in 1973; next, it highlights some of the research advances made in recent years in diagnosing the effects of fetal alcohol exposure, elucidating the mechanisms through which alcohol exerts its detrimental effects, preventing prenatal alcohol exposure, and developing treatments for affected individuals.

Outline: I.Diagnosing the Effects of Fetal Alcohol Exposure. II.Progress and Challenges for FASD Research III. Mechanisms of Alcohol’s Prenatal Effects. IV. Prevention and Intervention V. Preventing Potentially Harmful Alcohol Consumption.VI. Interventions for Alcohol-Exposed Individuals.VII. Therapeutics.

Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to: 1) Identify the terminology used to describe alcohol’s effects including FAS,  FAE, and FASD; 2) Discuss the progress and challenges of FASD research; 3)  Explain the consequences of prenatal alcohol exposure; 4) Recall interventions for alcohol exposed individuals.

 

Course: The Role of Mutual Help Groups in Extending the Framework of Treatment

Course Description: This text is from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism’s Alcohol Research and Health publication. Peer run mutual help groups (MHGs), such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), have emerged and proliferated in the past 75 years and continue to play an important role in recovery from AUDs. This text describes the nature and prevalence of MHGs, particularly AA, and reviews evidence for their effectiveness and cost effectiveness and the mechanisms through which they may exert their effects. The text also provides details about how health care professionals can facilitate their alcohol dependent clients’ participation in such groups and reviews the evidence for the benefits of doing so.

Outline: I.Evidence for the Effectiveness of MHGs. II.Cost Effectiveness of MHGs. III.Mechanisms of Change in MHGs. IV.Facilitating Participation in MHGs. V.Clinicians Can Make a Difference in Patients’ MHG Attendance. VI.Evidence for the Beneficial Effects of TSF on Alcohol Use Outcomes.

Objectives: Upon completion of this course, participants will: 1) Review the evidence for the effectiveness of MHDs; 2) Evaluate the cost savings of MHGs; 3) Assess the mechanisms of change in MHGs; 4) Understand the importance of therapists facilitating patient participation in MHGs. 

 

Course: CO-OCCURRING RISK FACTORS FOR ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE AND HABITUAL SMOKING

Course Description: Genetic factors play a significant role in both alcohol and nicotine dependence, and studies in twins have shown that people with family histories of alcohol and nicotine dependence are 50 to 60 percent more likely to develop problems with alcohol and smoking. In this text, findings are reviewed from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) that have identified several chromosomal regions and specific genes that may contribute to the development of alcohol dependence and habitual smoking. Although some of these genetic factors are specific to dependence on one drug, others are associated with dependence on both drugs.

Outline: I.OVERVIEW OF COGA II. FAMILY STUDIES OF ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE AND HABITUAL SMOKING III. GENETIC LINKAGE ANALYSIS OF HABITUAL SMOKING AND ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE IV. CANDIDATE GENE ASSOCIATION STUDIES FOR ALCOHOL AND NICOTINE DEPENDENCE V. Other Candidate Genes VI. CONCLUSION

Objectives: Upon course completion, participants will: 1) Review the purpose of COGA; 2) Assess results of family studies of alcohol dependence and habitual smoking; 3) Evaluate genetic linkage analysis of habitual smoking and alcohol dependence; 4) Understand the process of candidate gene association studies for alcohol and nicotine dependence involving GABA system; 5) Understand the importance of other genes associated with alcohol and nicotine dependence.

 

Course: BARRIERS AND SOLUTIONS TO ADDRESSING TOBACCO DEPENDENCE IN ADDICTION TREATMENT PROGRAMS

Course Description: Despite the high prevalence of smoking among people recovering from addiction, tobacco dependence is rarely addressed in addiction treatment programs. This Alcohol Research and Health text identifies and address barriers to treating tobacco dependence among patients in addiction treatment programs. According to the authors, programs must be modified to recognize and treat tobacco dependence—for example, by screening for tobacco use, offering nicotine replacement therapies and smoking cessation medication on inpatient units, and bundling costs so that programs can bill tobacco dependence treatment under the primary disorder.

Outline: I. INTEGRATING TOBACCO DEPENDENCE TREATMENT AT THE CLINICAL, PROGRAM, AND SYSTEM LEVELS II. BARRIERS III. Staff Attitudes and Tobacco Use IV. Lack of Training V. Clinical Lore VI. Smoke-Free Buildings and Resistance to Smoke-Free Grounds VII. Limited Treatment Resources VIII. SOLUTIONS IX.CONCLUSION

Objectives: Upon course completion, participants will: 1) Identify justifications for integrating tobacco dependence treatment interventions at the clinical, program, and system levels; 2) Recall barriers to treating tobacco dependence including staff attitudes and lack of training; 3) Review some of the myths associated with treating tobacco dependence; 4) Understand the limited resources involved with tobacco dependence treatment; 5) Identify solutions to implementing tobacco policy changes.